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  • The Lithuanian Aerospace Company Sign Deal with Ethiopian Air Force

    FL Technics, a global prThe Lithuanian Aerospace Company Sign Deal with Ethiopian Air Forceovider of tailor-made aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul services, has announced winning the tender organized by the Ethiopian Air Force for the supply of spare parts and components for training, transport and multi-purpose aircraft. FL Technics and the Ethiopian Air Force have signed a component supply agreement according to which the company’s military division – FL Technics Defence – shall ensure the provision of various spare parts for Aero L-39 Albatros, transport Antonov An-12 and multi-purpose An-32 airplanes.

    The first set of spare parts has been already delivered to the customer with the remaining components to reach Addis Ababa until the end of spring. FL Technics will provide the required components from its own stock and the network of worldwide partners.
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    Image: Ethiopian Air Force Jets

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  • Care International: Without More Funding Food Supplies for Drought Affected Ethiopians will Run Out in the next few Weeks

    In the southeastern of Ethiopia, Tuba, a mother of four prepares a meal for her children with the very last sorghum grains she had left. These seeds were supposed to be planted for the next harvest. The El Niño weather system has caused an extreme drought in Ethiopia. Crops have failed completely in large areas of the country. More than 10 million people depend on food assistance from the government and aid agencies like CCare International: Without More Funding Food Supplies for Drought Affected Ethiopians will Run Out in the next few WeeksARE, but without more funding food supplies will run out in the next few weeks.
    Tuba Aliye lives in Robayo in Eastern Hararghe with her three of her four children. She had to send one child away to live with her sister, as she could not provide for all herself. Her husband has gone to work in a nearby city. He used to farm the land, but now the harvest has failed twice and there is no more farm work to do.
    The family now has three livestock and two chickens. They used to have more than twenty. Tuba bought an ox with a loan from the Village Saving Loan Association (VSLA). They were going to use it for farming, but now they cannot farm, and she is unable to sell it because today nobody can afford to buy. So they have to keep it, and feed it, which is hard when they do not even have food enough to eat themselves.
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    Image: Tuba prepares food for her children with the very last sorghum grains she has leftTuba prepares food for her children with the very last sorghum grains she has left

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  • A sensory experience of Addis Ababa

    About two weeks ago, while attending a conference in Addis Ababa, I got an opportunity to sample Ethiopian cuisine as well as explore the country’s extolled garment market. In this rugged, landlocked country split by the Great Rift Valley, you get used to the sound of construction. Ethiopia’s infrastructure binge sA sensory experience of Addis Ababahows no signs of slowing down. From Bole International Airport where engineers are working on giving the airport a face-lift, to the upmarket streets where your view from the hotel is that of the city’s concrete jungle.

    Away from the roaring cranes is a city rich in history. From the famous monolithic rock-cut churches in Lalibela town to the Yekatit 12 monument, which is on the roundabout Siddist Kilo. On the last day of my trip, I chose to tour Addis. However, I needed a guide and interpreter because the majority of Ethiopians only converse in their own languages. This limited my tour to simply visiting the garment market and sampling the town’s food culture.

    By 9am, the concierge at the hotel where I was staying had called a taxi for me. The taxi driver cum guide, Lemma Belete, agreed to drive and show me around. Our first stop was Shiro Meda, a garment market, where hundreds of vendors line the busy Entoto Road and sell netela and habesha kamis — traditional shawls and dresses — from central and northern Ethiopia, most often made from shemma, a cotton cloth that is handwoven in long strips and sewn together, with a decorative border.
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    LEft, The food was served on a woven grass mat and a ceramic bowl and conveniently placed on low wooden tables. Right, Lemma Belete, a taxi driver in Addis Ababa helped me choose the best quality gabi. PHOTO | ELIZABETH MERAB  LEft, The food was served on a woven grass mat and a ceramic bowl and conveniently placed on low wooden tables. Right, Lemma Belete, a taxi driver in Addis Ababa helped me choose the best quality gabi. PHOTO | ELIZABETH MERAB

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  • Indo-Spanish Contractors Win Bid of Road Construction in Ethiopian

    Indian contractor IL&FS TIndo-Spanish Contractors Win Bid of Road Construction in Ethiopian ransportation Networks (IL&FS) and its fully-owned Spanish arm Elsamex have been awarded a $221.7 million road project in Ethiopia writes SAM OKWAKOL.

    In a recent interview on the sidelines of the US-Africa Business Summit in Addis Ababa, Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn Ethiopia said: "Ehiopia is a fast-growing economy, because we are investing heavily in infrastructure. If we want to harvest the infrastructure dividend, we need to attract more investment." The new contract is for an 84.56 kilometre route connecting Agamsa-Bure as well as an 86.1km stretch from Nekempte-Anger Gutin-Andhode. The World Bank is paying for the project which is expected to take eight years.
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    Image: Road Construction. Ministry of Transport FB.

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  • They call us crazy': the Question Raised on Ethiopia’s Space Science Millions Dollar Investment

    With its clear skies and closeness to the equator, Ethiopia is an ideal location for space exploration. Yet for a developing country facing its worst drought in They call us crazy': the Question Raised on Ethiopia’s Space Science Millions Dollar Investment 50 years, spending millions of dollars to look at the stars might, at first, seem frivolous. “They call us crazy because they think we’re [only] exploring outer space and gazing at the stars. But they can’t see the bigger picture,” says Abinet Ezra of the Ethiopian Space Science Society. Sitting in a roadside café near the Addis Ababa Institute of Technology, Ezra explains that the “bigger picture” means using space research to expand the economy, improve agriculture, fight climate change and create jobs.

    The Ethiopian Space Science Society, which has recruited 10,000 members since being launched in 2004 by three aspiring astronomers, has recently opened east Africa’s only space observatory on the 3,200-metre summit of Entoto, overlooking Addis Ababa. The multi-million dollar Entoto Observatory and Research Centre has become one of the prime places to view Orion’s Belt – which appears larger and more pronounced here than from other parts of the northern hemisphere.
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    Image: Ethiopia’s closeness to the equator and clear skies makes it an ideal location for space exploration. Photograph: Natasha Stallard

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  • Protest Take Gloss off Ethiopia’s Impressive Construction Boom

    WHEN Ethiopian farmer Mulugeta Mezemir ceded his land three years ago to property developers on the fringes of the expanding capital, Addis Ababa, he felt he had no choice. A gated community with white picket fences and mock Roman pillars built by Country Club Developers now occupProtest Take Gloss off Ethiopia’s Impressive Construction Boomies the fields he tilled in Legetafo, Oromia region, after the 60-year-old said local government officials convinced him to accept an offer or face expropriation. He took the cash and vacated the land, which in Ethiopia is all state-owned.

    “We were sad, but we thought at the time that they were going to take the land for free,” said Mulugeta, a father of 12, while feeding hay to cattle a few meters from foundations for the next phase of housing. “We thought it was better to take whatever they were paying.” As Ethiopia, which the International Monetary Fund estimates saw 8.7% economic growth in the last fiscal year, undergoes a construction boom, complaints over evictions and unfair compensation have fomented the country’s most serious domestic political crisis in a decade.

    ‘Crooked officials’

    In protests by the largest ethnic group, the Oromo, that began in November, security forces allegedly shot dead as many as 266 demonstrators, according to the Kenya-based Ethiopian Human Rights Project. The government says many people died, including security officers, without giving a toll. Foreign investors including Dangote Cement Plc had property damaged. Ethiopian Communication Minister Getachew Reda said protesters were in part angry at “some crooked officials” who have been “lining their pockets by manipulating” land deals around the capital. Property developers CCD followed legal procedures, paid standard rates of compensation and employed many members of farmers’ families, according to Tedros Messele, a member of the company’s management team. Cases such as Mulugeta’s have been a growing trend on the outskirts of the capital over the past two decades, said Nemera Mamo, an economist at Sussex University in England. No recent, independent studies have been conducted into how many people have been affected.
    Read More Here

    Image: Farmer Mulugeta Mezemir ia one of the Ethiopians affected. Photo/Bloomberg

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