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  • Ethiopia: Addis Ababa - A Fruit of Combination of Oriental, African and European Civilizations

    Ethiopia: Addis Ababa - A Fruit of Combination of Oriental, African and European Civilizations
    Ethiopia: Addis Ababa - A Fruit of Combination of Oriental, African and European Civilizations

    We are overly joyous to host an encyclopedic intellectual and a shining information and arts star Ustaz Mus'ab al-Sawey. As a first contribution to SUDANOW, he selected a travel writing article from his diary on a past visit to the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa:

    In response to a kind invitation by the Municipality and Mayor of Addis Ababa and in the context of an existing twin-ship between Khartoum State and Addis, a delegation of Khartoum State headed by Youth and Sports Minister Al-Tayeb Hassan Badawy travelled to the Ethiopian capital for participation in celebrations marking the 125th anniversary of the birth of the city. The delegation was made up of Eng. Hamad al-Nil Abdul Hamid, the Twin-ship Coordinator, Anus al-Natiq, from the Public Relations and Protocols and Abdul Rahman Hassan Abdul Rahman, from the Information Office of the Governor of Khartoum State.

    The Khartoum State participation in the celebrations included a friendly football match between The Ethiopian Saint George Club and the Sudan Ahly Club led by a group of prominent administrators, technicians and supervisors led by Coach Lutfy al-Silaimy, a French national of Tunisian origin.

    Addis Ababa welcomed the delegation of Khartoum State at the airport hall with genuine flowers and basils, put on our shoulders with the bright-colored Ethiopian shawls and colorful hats on our heads while a band played Sudanese music as a gesture of hospitality.

    The twin-ship of Addis Ababa and Khartoum State resulted from an initiative by Khartoum State Governor Abdul Rahman al-Khidir. Following its signing by the top executive and political bodies in Addis Ababa Municipality, the twin-ship opened up wide avenues and opportunities for joint cooperation. This included investment in the economic field, exchange of visits, training, exchange of experience and sports, cultural and artistic partnerships, bearing in mind that the sports and arts represent a bridge for unity of the brothers and noting that the Sudanese music is widely spread in Ethiopia and also remembering that the Sudan and Ethiopia were the first founders of the African Football Associations Federation. For this reason the Ethiopian brothers invited a Sudanese football team -Al-Ahly- for this visit.

    Read More at allAfrica

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  • The Ethiopian bicycle bandit faces 100 years prison

    Alleged ‘bicycle bandit’ indicted on theft, weapons charges
    By Associated Press


    ALEXANDRIA, Va. — A man known as the “bicycle bandit” for fleeing on two wheels after allegedly robbing a dozen banks in Virginia faces more than 100 years in prison.

    A federal grand jury on Thursday indicted 42-year-old Wossen Assaye on charges including bank robbery, escape, kidnapping and firearms offenses.

    Assaye was arrested in March. Authorities say he tried to kill himself while in custody and was taken to a hospital.



    While there, prosecutors say he overpowered and briefly kidnapped one of his guards. They say he then fled the hospital and evaded authorities for nine hours during a frantic search that ended in Washington, D.C.

    Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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  • Ethiopia: New wave of refugees fleeing ongoing violence in South Sudan

    Ethiopia: New wave of refugees fleeing ongoing violence in South Sudan
    Ethiopia: New wave of refugees fleeing ongoing violence in South Sudan

    Intense fighting between warring parties in South Sudan has forced hundreds of thousands civilians to flee, creating a new wave of displacement in a conflict that has already displaced more than two million people. Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) and other international aid organisations has been forced to suspend relief operations in some war-affected areas of South Sudan, leaving civilians without lifesaving aid.

    Seeking refuge and assistance, more than 6,000 people have arrived in the Gambella region in western Ethiopia, adding to the growing the number of South Sudanese refugees who have fled to the area since clashes first broke out in South Sudan in late 2013. According to UNHCR, there are now more than 200,000 South Sudanese refugees in Ethiopia. More are arriving each day.

    Below we talk to Sylvain Perron, MSF’s head of mission in Ethiopia, to understand the humanitarian needs in Gambella:

    What is the situation at the border between South Sudan and Ethiopia?

    It’s been reported that more than 100,000 South Sudanese have recently been displaced in increasing violence over the past few weeks. The number of South Sudanese seeking refuge in Ethiopia is also rising.

    According to UNHCR, more than 6,000 people have fled the violence and crossed into Ethiopia, especially in Pagak, one of the main entry points, since the beginning of the month. This number is far higher than in previous months. The figure includes unregistered people either living in the camps or people by the border who are seeking better protection and services to enter the new refugee camp opened by the Ethiopian Authorities and UNHCR.

    Our teams on the ground are seeing many new refugees who are living in precarious conditions. The majority of them are suffering from malaria, diarrhoea and skin diseases contracted during their long, difficult journey from South Sudan.

    Is there a cohesive humanitarian strategy regarding South Sudanese refugees?

    In 2014, repeated influxes of refugees stretched the capacity of all actors present in Gambella Region. The rainy season then further complicated the provision of assistance. All actors have now resumed their presence and activities in Pagak.

    In collaboration with the Ethiopian Administration for Refugees and Returnees Affairs (ARRA), the UNHCR conducted a relocation operation to ensure better protection and better humanitarian services. Since the beginning of May, more than 40,000 refugees have been relocated from the flood-prone Leitchuor and Nip-Nip Camps near the border with South Sudan, to the newly established Jewi camp, which is only 18 kilometres away from Gambella’s regional capital, Gambella town.

    The relocation is a good thing for the refugees and humanitarian actors alike. The new site is far less susceptible to flooding, which will make it easier to cope with needs. But NGOs and others international partners are struggling with the pace of the relocation. An average of 3,500 individuals are being relocated every day and there are not enough latrines, for instance, or enough water, and UNHCR cannot set up family tents quickly enough.

    Read More at Relief Web

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  • How far is Kenya from Ethiopia? Chronicles of an exiled journalist

    How far is Kenya from Ethiopia? Chronicles of an exiled journalist
    How far is Kenya from Ethiopia? Chronicles of an exiled journalist
    FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION: Demonstrater outside parliament. 'Any Kenyan passing by does not automatically assume that this person is mad. For them, he is one citizen who is practising his right of dissent, picket and protest. Had it been in Ethiopia, this man could be writing his own death warrant.'

    Sometime back in December last year, I visited the Nairobi Central Business District. Walking down the streets of Nairobi was a unique experience for me as an exiled journalist from Ethiopia. You see, I am now like the Greek philosopher – Diogenes of Sinope – for I have no home.

    My fate is to sleep or eat wherever I find vacant and safe. It looks like the fate of someone who yearns for a glimpse of freedom. Compared to Nairobi, my Addis Ababa is a failed blueprint.

    The beautiful buildings, the clean road, the big malls, the green parks and swarms of cars demonstrate Nairobi’s great success. Nairobi is like a beautiful lady in a fashionable dress, while Addis is a midget in a towel.

    But I am not a layman. I am a patriotic writer who loves his own country. At least I should hide my emotions. The mesmerising scenery shall not make me complain about my country. I know I am feeling a bit jealous but I manage to cool it by murmuring, “had we been in the hand of a colonial power for some time…”

    Yes, this works for some time. But once again what I am looking at engulfs my emotion. Even though I struggle not to appreciate what is before my eyes, what I was to see next made me to curse myself, my government and a bit of my country.

    The man with the megaphone

    Harambee House is a building where His Excellency President Uhuru Kenyatta spends his days working. Unlike our Prime Minister’s office, this compound is guarded by a few men. You are not required to bow your head when you pass by.

    In front of Harambee House, I find a young man with a megaphone yelling some words. Even though he is speaking Kiswahili, I can easily tell he is in vehement anger and rage. Suddenly I hear an English phrase between his Kiswahili that leaves me jaw-dropped. “You Mr President should resign from your place! You are doing nothing! Shame on you! Shame on you!’’ I can’t believe it. This young man is protesting his President, and no one is trying to stop him. Even the guards are chatting with each other as if there is nothing going on.

    Can you imagine if this young man dared to say such words in front of the Ethiopian prime minister’s office? It is hard to guess what would have happened. Before he utters a single word, he will find himself on the ground blood-soaked. But in Kenya, I witnessed a young man who is asking his President to step down, and no one is stopping him from doing so. Any Kenyan passing by does not automatically assume that this person is mad. For them, he is one citizen who is practising his right of dissent, picket and protest. Had it been in Ethiopia, this man could be writing his own death warrant.

    Read More at The Star

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  • Center trains Ethiopian-Israelis for high-tech careers

    Center trains Ethiopian-Israelis for high-tech careers
    Center trains Ethiopian-Israelis for high-tech careers
    Protesters, mainly Israeli Jews of Ethiopian origin, run at a main road in Tel Aviv as they block it during a demonstration against what they say is police racism and brutality, May 3, 2015. (photo by REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

    In the last decade Israeli high-tech firms have become the most desirable workplaces in the local market. Their employees have the most promising careers and rewarding benefits. This work environment stands in stark contrast to the situation of Ethiopian-Israelis in the job market, with unemployment twice as high as the general rate and higher poverty rates than the average. Ethiopian workers are concentrated in the lowest paying jobs in the market.

    Over the years, young Israeli-Ethiopians were marginalized. They were pushed aside by society, and turned into ''transparent'' beings, almost. This ongoing discrimination motivated in April thousands on these youngsters to go out to the streets and demonstrate. The extent of this rage, expressed also by violent clashes with the police at the heart of Tel Aviv, took Israeli public by surprise.

    But despite their socio-economic disadvantage, young Ethiopians aren’t willing to give up on the Israeli high-tech dream. Leading efforts in this field is the Tech-Career technology training center for Ethiopian-Israelis, established in 2004 by an Ethiopian-Israeli — Asher Elias, 45. The center aims to train youngsters of Ethiopian origin in those high-tech professions which are most sought after.

    Read More at Almonitor

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  • 50 Killed in Somali-Ethiopian Border Clashes

    At least 50 people were killed and scores injured in week-long border clashes between Somali clan militia and an Ethiopian paramilitary unit, Somali authorities said on Monday.



    Most of the victims were civilians caught in the week-long fighting between the Somali militia and the Ethiopian force known as "Liyu police", Xinhua quoted Somalia's Galgadud region Governor Hussein Weheliye Cirfo as saying.

    "The Liyu police unit attacked the Somali nomad community, killing 50 people, among them 11 women," said Cirfo, adding that hundreds of families fled the villages as fighting escalated on Monday.

    Somali Interior Minister Abdirahman Odowaa said his government was working with Ethiopian authorities to resolve the issue.

    "We are talking with our counterparts in Ethiopia so that we can find an amicable solution to this problem," Odowaa said.


    Liyu police is an Ethiopian paramilitary unit operating in Ethiopia's ethnic Somali region.

    Source: newindianexpress.com

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