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Ethiopian News

The Travel Show: Ethiopia, a great new frontier in tourism

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by girumtebeje Filed under: Ethiopian News Economy Social Affairs
The Travel Show: Ethiopia, a great new frontier in tourism


Ethiopia is not often associated with tourism, but as Fionn Davenport heard today during The Irish Times travel podcast, that might be changing.



Ethiopia is easy to get to, with direct flights from London and Frankfurt. Next year, it will get easier with a new Ethiopian Airlines route from Addis Ababa to Los Angeles making a stop in Dublin.



Travel writer Gary Quinn spoke of how he highly recommends taking an organised trip with a guide. “The distances you’re going to travel and the number of places you want to see are so vast, you need someone who really knows the area.


He also says that the internal flight network is great, especially along the historic trail in the north, but added: “I don’t know if they’re set up yet for really independent travel”.

The country is large - about the size of France and Spain combined and with a population of 90 million - and incredibly diverse. About 90 different languages are spoken. “We’ve had translators for translators. You can go 40 kilometres down the road, and you’ll need a different translator,” said Diane Weatherup of sight-saving charity Orbis. She takes a charity group to Ethiopia every November. They do the Great Ethiopian Run, a 10-kilometre run popular with locals and visitors alike. 

There are vast differences in landscape, with the arid Omo Valley in the south and the lush historic trail in the north. Writer Anto Howard took a trek through the villages near Lalibella in the north of the country. He travelled to Ethiopia in 2010 while his wife was filming there for her work.

He said while she was filming at a market in capital city Addis Ababa, “people came and took her camera away”, claiming she did not have the necessary permits to film there. “The state is definitely in charge,” he said, referring to the country’s poor human rights record.

“I think we don’t explore enough what our responsibilities are and how deeply we should look at these countries when we go into them,” said Gary Quinn.

Weatherup, however, works closely with the government for her charity. “Our purpose is to educate them” about health and sanitation. “We try to involve the government, and it works really well for us.

Source: Irish Times


An investor who killed and wounded lawyers in Hawassa arrested

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by girumtebeje Filed under: Ethiopian News Law & Order
An investor who killed and wounded lawyers in Hawassa arrested

An investor who has killed a lawyer and wounded another in Hawassa ten days ago put under custody yesterday. An investor who is the owner of the Hawassa’s Blue Nile Hotel was arrested yesterday in Addis while trying to flee the country.

Debub police has been searching for the suspect, Ato Tamerat Mulu, in collaboration with Federal and regional police forces.

Debub region police commissioner, Fisseha Garedew told FBC that the suspect was apprehended in Addis while planning to flee the country after his failed attempt to cross the border via Wollo.

The suspect is under investigation.


DireTube News

Report: Ethiopia needs 2.5 billion dollars a year to develop critical power generation projects

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by bini Filed under: Ethiopian News Business Economy
Report: Ethiopia needs 2.5 billion dollars a year to develop critical power generation projects
By Elias Meseret

A new report has revealed that Ethiopia needs an estimated 2.5 billion dollars a year to develop its critical power generation projects. The report was announced today ahead of the third ‘Powering Africa’ Conference that will be held next month here in Addis.

Next month's two day Conference is expected to connect the Ethiopian government with international and local power and infrastructure developers and financiers that are seeking new investment opportunities.

The Conference that will be held at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Addis Ababa is set to bring together senior level executives in the power value chain to drive forward investment into Ethiopia’s energy sector.

Ethiopia is currently leading the way for a green economy with resourceful emerging markets. Organizers of the meeting said the Conference will also help to explore different financing models to support power projects. Poor regulatory frameworks have been a recurring issue in the power sector in Ethiopia that has proved to be limiting. Ethiopia is aiming to support the economic development of the region by bringing the industry’s key players in one place to invest and grow together.

DireTube News


EFF denied reports of Keshi talks to coach Ethiopia

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by bini Filed under: Ethiopian News Sport News
EFF denied reports of Keshi talks to coach Ethiopia
By Elias Meseret

The Ethiopian Football Federation (EFF) told DireTube today that it is not in talks with the former Nigerian coach, Stephen Keshi. Public Relations Head of EFF, Womdimkun Alayou, has denied earlier reports that Keshi is expected in Ethiopia this week to finalise discussions over taking charge of the country’s team.

"There have not been any formal or informal talks with Keshi so far. The current coach is still in charge. I don't know where the reports come from," Wondimkun told Dire Tube on Monday morning.

Reports of Keshi's interest to coach Ethiopia came after he was fired by the Nigerian Football Federation last week after the country labored to qualify for next year’s AFCON.

Keshi has previously coached Togo and Mali.

Algeria have already qualified for the tournament proper after compiling 12 points.

Arabica in Addis Ababa: Climbing the coffee ladder in Ethiopia

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by girumtebeje Filed under: Ethiopian News Business Economy Social Affairs
Arabica in Addis Ababa: Climbing the coffee ladder in Ethiopia

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Eighteen-year-old Aster Endale quickly gives the coffee cups a rinse before putting them back into her basket and picking up a bag with canisters of coffee. Then she crosses the road, weaving between traffic, to find her next customers.

Time wasted is coffee not poured — and money not earned — in the Ethiopian capital, where the humble cup of coffee is contributing to economic advancement starting at the lowest level and finishing at the counters of upmarket gourmet coffee houses in Tokyo and beyond.

Coffee has long played a central role in Ethiopia’s macroeconomic fortunes as the country’s largest export earner. In 2012 coffee exports generated more than $800 million, a figure expected to exceed $1 billion by 2015.

But besides the grand figures in annual economic reports, the simple act of selling a cup of cheap coffee plays a significant socioeconomic role for many trying to carve out a better life in Ethiopia. This is especially true amid the hubbub of a rapidly changing Addis Ababa, where a hierarchy of diverse coffee services by various practitioners exists.

At the bottom are women like Endale, roaming the streets carrying flasks in baskets full of tiny porcelain cups and saucers, dispensing coffee for three Ethiopian birr ($0.15) a cup. Next in line are the traditional coffee stands, known as jeubeuna bunna, outside bars and restaurants serving coffee for five birr ($0.25) a cup. Then there are the established coffeehouses, where a cup costs upward of 10 birr ($0.50).

“Everyone wants to graduate to the next level,” said Wondwossen Meshesha, operations manager for Tomoca, one of Addis’ original coffeehouses, inaugurated in 1953 by Emperor Haile Selassie.

For Tomoca, the next level up means securing foreign partners to help it export more roasted coffee to new international markets — doubling the revenue of raw beans, traditionally the bulk of Ethiopia’s coffee exports — and even opening cafes abroad.

Tomoca first wants to expand regionally into Djibouti, Kenya and Sudan, before going beyond Africa. It already has a partner based in Japan that distributes to restaurants, department stores and cafes there, and Tomoca is working toward similar partnerships in North America and Europe.

“Ethiopian coffees have two major advantages over all other coffees in the world,” said Geoff Watts, vice president of coffee at Intelligentsia Coffee, a Chicago-based roasting company. “Incredible genetic diversity and near perfect growing conditions.”


Read More at Aljazeera

Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia to choose int'l firm by December

Published: Oct 20, 2014 by girumtebeje Filed under: Ethiopian News Politics
Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia to choose int'l firm by December

Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia will choose by December an international firm to conduct studies on Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam, which Cairo fears will reduce its share of potable Nile water.
 
In a press conference held in Cairo on Sunday, Egypt's irrigation minister Hossam Moghazi said on Sunday this week's tripartite talks over the dam in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum succeeded in establishing the terms upon which the three countries will choose the firm.
 
These terms have been sent to seven international consultancy firms, the minister said, which will be invited to Cairo to meet the three countries' representatives.
 
The seven firms are from Germany, Switzerland, France, Holland and Australia, according to Sudan's irrigation minister, Moatez Moussa.
 
The financial and technical offers of the firms will be accepted in late November, he said.
 
A tripartite technical committee will hold a meeting on 4 December in Khartoum to study the offers and then choose the firm in Addis Ababa on 16 December. The firm will assess the dam's impact over the next five months.
 
The firm's report will include the dam's impact on upstream Nile countries, Egypt and Sudan, as well as its environmental, social and economic effects.
 
Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam, set to be the largest hydroelectric dam in Africa, has been a source of worry for Egyptian officials, who believe it will affect the country's access to the Nile's water.
 
Ethiopia has denied that it will have any adverse affects. Some 40 percent of the dam has already been built, Ethiopian President Mulatu Teshome said earlier this month.


Source: Ahram Online


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