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Ethiopia: Jovago Opens New Office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Published: May 23, 2015 by yonas2007 Filed under: Ethiopian News Business Economy
Ethiopia: Jovago Opens New Office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Ethiopia: Jovago Opens New Office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Online hotel booking portal Jovago has announced the opening of an office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia this May. The office will be the company's first in Ethiopia, in a move aimed at bringing service development and business management closer to the Ethiopian market.

Jovago's presence comes in response to the regional demand and growth in online bookings. This is well indicated in a recent regional survey which placed online hotel bookings at 37 per cent while a report by UNWTO put online travel related activity at 59 per cent worldwide. Ethiopia has also shown great interest and potential in growing this tourism sector, with about 400 hotels in Ethiopia now partnering with hence creating the largest online network of hotels there.

"This new proximity to both our customers and partner-hotels is a key driver in both business development and effective customer service" said Estelle Verdier, the Managing Director of Jovago.com East and Southern Africa, "Addis Abeba is a favourable location, in addition to offering a gateway to diverse continental touristic destinations, the Habesha hospitality and culture offers a platform to bring unique service to the Ethiopian population."

Read More at allAfrica


Ethiopia: a cradle of mankind

Published: May 23, 2015 by yonas2007 Filed under: Ethiopian News Politics
Ethiopia: a cradle of mankind
Ethiopia: a cradle of mankind

Addis Ababa - Ethiopia, which holds elections on Sunday, has a history as a nation stretching back to pre-biblical times and is considered one of the birthplaces of humanity.

Here are some key facts about Africa's second most populous nation, which plays a key continental role as host of the African Union's headquarters.

- Multiple ethnic groups -

With some 94 million people, according to World Bank figures, the Horn of Africa nation is also home to several hundred thousand refugees fleeing war in neighbouring Somalia and South Sudan.

Many Ethiopians live abroad, making up a sizeable part of immigrant flows to Europe and Israel.

There are more than 80 ethnic groups including the Oromos, who are the most numerous, the Amharas, the Tigreans, the Afars and the Somalis.

Read More at The Peninsula


Ethiopia's election is a wake-up call on human rights and sound governance

Published: May 23, 2015 by yonas2007 Filed under: Ethiopian News Politics
Ethiopia's election is a wake-up call on human rights and sound governance
Ethiopia's election is a wake-up call on human rights and sound governance
An election rally staged by the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front in Addis Ababa. There is widespread public indifference about the poll. Photograph: Tiksa Negeri/Reuters

The international community must challenge Ethiopia’s oppressive regime by funding local human rights and democracy groups.

On Sunday, millions of Ethiopians will line up at polling stations to participate in Africa’s largest exercise of political theatre. A decade-long campaign by Ethiopia’s government to silence dissent forcibly has left the country without a viable political opposition, without independent media, and without public challenges to the ruling party’s ideology.

For most Ethiopians, these elections are a non-event.
The one potential dividend of these sham polls, however, is the international attention they will garner for the government’s growing political repression. The blatant disregard for internationally recognised standards for free and fair elections just might convince Ethiopia’s largest donors that it is time to rethink their relationship with an increasingly authoritarian government.

As long as democratic governance and respect for human rights are pushed aside by donors in favour of economic development and security cooperation, Ethiopia’s long-term stability is at serious risk.

Since 2005, the ruling Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front’s (EPRDF) has cracked down on independent media and human rights groups.

In 2009, parliament passed the charities and societies proclamation, which placed restrictive regulations on non-government organisations, including limitations on foreign funding. Today,only a handful of these groups exist, and most are struggling to survive.

The preferred government strategy for eliminating independent media is to file criminal charges against publishers, and to impose hefty fines and prison terms. When lawsuits do not succeed, the government simply arrests journalists, as occurred last year when bloggers and journalists affiliated with the Zone 9 blogging collective were apprehended. The group remains imprisoned and charged as terrorists.

Post-election, the EPRDF, secure in its hold on power, might be willing to allow a small degree of dissent: Ethiopian officials are increasingly wary of reactions by the international community to the crackdown on critics and in 2013 published a national human rights action plan.

Read More at The Guardian


Ethiopia’s First Film at Cannes Gives Moving View of Childhood, Gender

Published: May 23, 2015 by yonas2007 Filed under: Entertainment Art & Culture Ethiopian News
Ethiopia’s First Film at Cannes Gives Moving View of Childhood, Gender
Ethiopia’s First Film at Cannes Gives Moving View of Childhood, Gender
A boy, a sheep and a stunning mountain landscape – the three stars of 'Lamb', Ethiopia’s first entry in France’s prestigious Cannes International Film Festival, a film which subtly highlights gender issues, the ravages of drought and the isolation that comes from the feeling of not belonging. Credit: Courtesy of Slum Kid Films

CANNES, May 22 2015 (IPS) - A boy, a sheep and a stunning mountain landscape. These are the three stars of Lamb, a poignant film directed by 36-year-old Yared Zeleke and Ethiopia’s first entry in France’s prestigious Cannes International Film Festival.

The film was warmly received at its premiere this week, with the director and cast receiving applause. It is slated for general French release later this year, Zeleke said.
Shot in the highlands and forests of northern and central Ethiopia, Lamb tells the story of nine-year-old Ephraim (Rediat Amare) and his beloved pet, a sheep named Chuni. The animal follows Ephraim around like a devoted dog, and plays the role of best friend, albeit one who can only say “ba-ah”.

When the film begins, we learn that Ephraim has lost his mother in an ongoing famine and, in order to survive, his father has decided to take him to stay with relatives in a remote but greener region of their homeland, an area of intense beauty but increasing poverty. Ephraim will have to stay there while his father seeks work in the city, not knowing when he can return.

The relatives are an intriguing bunch. There’s the strict farmer uncle who thinks Ephraim is too girly (the boy likes to cook), his wife who’s overworked and worried about her small, sick child, a matriarchal great aunt who tries to keep the family in line with a whip, and an older girl cousin – Tsion – who spends her time reading and with whom Ephraim eventually bonds.

Soon after arriving in their midst, Ephraim is told by his uncle that he will have to learn what boys do: he will have to slaughter his pet sheep for an upcoming traditional feast.

The news pushes Ephraim to start devising ways to save Chuni, and that forms the bulk of the storyline, while the film subtly highlights gender issues, the ravages of drought and the isolation that comes from the feeling of not belonging. Throughout it all, the magnificent rolling hills are there, watching.

Read More at Inter Press Service


Ethiopia returns nationals stranded in conflict-hit Yemen

Published: May 23, 2015 by yonas2007 Filed under: Ethiopian News Social Affairs
Ethiopia returns nationals stranded in conflict-hit Yemen
Ethiopia returns nationals stranded in conflict-hit Yemen

May 22,2015 (ADDIS ABABA) - The Ethiopian government has continued to evacuate thousands of citizens who are stranded in Yemen’s roiling violence.

Spokes person for the Ethiopian ministry of foreign affairs, Tewelde Mulgeta on Thursday said some 2,000 nationals have arrived home during the past week alone.

Up on arrival at Addis Ababa Bole international Airport, the repatriates are being welcomed on daily basis by government officials from the ministry of foreign affairs.

Approached by Sudan Tribune, arrivals, who most are women were overwhelmed with gratitude to the urgent response by the Ethiopian government and called for more coordinated effort to evacuate for those thousands who remained behind.

According to the government official, hundreds more will be repatriated via Saudi Arabia in the weeks to come.

The repatriation operation is underway in collaboration with the International Organization for Migration (IOM)

The horn of Africa’s nation intends to evacuate at least 50,000 Ethiopians stranded following the fighting erupted in March between Houthi rebels and forces loyal to ousted president.

Read More at Sudan Tribune


Journalists flowing to Ethiopia to report polls

Published: May 23, 2015 by Mihret L Filed under: Ethiopian News Politics
Journalists flowing to Ethiopia to report polls
Journalists flowing to Ethiopia to report polls

Journalists from various international media are flowing to Ethiopia to report the fifth general elections which will be held on Sunday.
 
According to the Electoral Board of Ethiopia, 60 journalists from international media have so far issued request to report the elections.
 
Demisew Benti PR head with Board said the number may be increased.
 
According to him, the Board has been preparing badges for the journalists that are going to report the polls.
 
"Presence of local and foreign journalists will enable Ethiopians locally and abroad to widely know about the election being held in our country; or to broadly show the election" he said.
 

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